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master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. -- putter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first -- golfers here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. -- but the fairway. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" think about that. if any of us
to have this in our mind. >> so this is a chapter in the book called the science of interfaith cooperation. and one of the things that i think is -- as interfaith cooperation grows and, by the way, if i was in the private sector, i would say buy interfaith, right? [laughter] it's, i think, like human rights or like environmentalism, it's a field that's going to grow dramatically. if you read any newspaper, you're going to see a lot of blood between the black and the white, right? and there's an unfortunate or amount of that blood that is done to the soundtrack of prayer. just to give you one example of this, one of the -- the question that people are focusing on when it comes to the transitions of muslim countries towards democracy and market economies are generally about governance and about economics. but frankly, there's a third key question as well, and that is can the christians and the muslims of egypt, can thal weets and -- alawites and shias, can they build societies together? can the kurds and the sunnis and shias of iraq, right? this is a question of how different sects and relig
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the rep
is an unabashed liberal, but she's on tv. i think she has a phd in something, like lyrical science or some thing. i think charles murray would not want to be called a pundit. he's famous for the controversy over the bell curve. this looks that great working-class to separate classroom raise which complicates everything. you look at how the values of the working class has gone down hill and is a way to alleviate, adopted middle-class values while the working middle class is a complex argument. two places to describe these things. it's an interesting, provocative book, somewhat more than someone ranting and rallying. >> host: charles murray is a scholar at the american enterprise institute as well. probably not fair to call him a political pundit. he launched his own imprint, but his talk show is off the air. can you see the result in his sales? >> guest: as far as i can tell, glenn beck, what he's been doing since he left fox is trying to build a brand that reaches a very dedicated community, not only through a satellite oriented radio show. he is a new site called the police. he has other things
is an unabashed liberal but she is also on tv but she has a ph.d. in something, political science or something and charles murray would not want to be called a pundit. he is famous for controversy over the bell curve. this looks at white working-class to try to separate class from race which complicate everything and he looks at how the values of the lower white working class of gone down. there is this white elite adopted middle-class value, the working class lost those, a complex argument, advanced two places to describe these things. it is interesting, it is more than somebody ranting and raving. >> a scholar with the american enterprise institute as well, probably not fair to call him a political pundits. what about glen beck? he launched his own imprint, but his fox show is off the air. can you see the result of his sales? >> as far as i can tell glyn back, what he has been doing since he left fox has been trying to build a brand that reaches of very dedicated community not only through satellite oriented radio show but a new site called the blaze and other things going on through his web
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
entrepreneur with a science degree or engineering degree and you graduate from mit. you want to start a high-tech company. would you started in the united states, where you're getting from your company years down the road will be taxed at 30%, or would you started in china or india where the capital gains tax rate is zero? many of our major partners have zero capital gains tax rates. if you are an entrepreneur or an investment and growth company, you would rather put your money there than in the united states in the future, which is really unfortunate. gerri: okay, let's talk about companies a little bit here. these tax rates are critical to growing companies. >> that's absoluty right. apple and microsoft, for example, benefited early on from high income individuals pumping and a few hundred thousand dollars to help those companies get started and grow. those high income people could alternatively put their money in and say tax-free muni bonds. if we raise the capital gains tax rates, which people are going to say, i'd ther put my money in state muni bonds. i'm not i am not going to fund the
as arming everybody in schools and teachers, look, i had high school science teachers who can't negotiate a bunson burner for goodness sake. i wouldn't suggest that we necessarily give everybody a gun, it's not for everybody. but how we deal with it in utah is going to be way different than how we deal with it in chicago. >> david, one thing that came out of your interview they've thought was interesting that the nra i didn't think would ever be on, he was calling for forcing states to participate more. if you're the obama administration and you're looking for the nra's help on something, well, forcing states to participate more on the background checks, all of these things that aren't happening, if the nra is going to do that and force these conservative republicans governors to sign legislation that did that, that would be a step. >> andrea, i want to talk about the second term cabinet. chuck hagel did not get a ringing endorsement from senator schumer or -- >> what senator schumer said was really very revealing. if a democratic senator is not going to come to chuck hagel's defense, i t
've been doing personal study. the thing that help me build it beyond science, different perspective on the industry. >> who are your heroes in the tech area? >> steve jobs i told mf
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant smoke? nah, i'm good. ♪ [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette, you celebrate a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the
's a science. >> you say it's so -- the worst part of it is that you go in, you think that people are looking at you. and then you start acting really weird. and then they stop you. >> you're pair reside. don't be paranoid, but then they are, actually, because you've been stopped at the door and they want to see your receipt. >> do you think you're being profiled? >> no. >> because he's wearing that jacket. they're profiling people -- >> now i order online so i don't have to worry about it. you can shop in your underwear. it's great. i was born for the internet. also you also like when he talks about how to lose weight. i love the simplicity of it and you say if you don't want to be fat, stop eating and you say that you have credibility on this for a good reason. >> there is a difference between, and you have to know this difference. what you want and what you want to want. i know someone when i first met her 20 years ago, she made a joke about being on a diet, but she was always on a diet and i saw her 15 years later and made a joke about her diet. after 15 years, you are still on a diet, yo
care about the science and less about the politics. >> do the -- does the specter of any type of price controls for pharmaceuticals, is that on the horizon for this country, or are we -- will we still lead the world in innovation because we won't -- we're not stupid enough to try to figure prices there? >> that's a leading question. >> it is. >> but the one major explicit price control mechanism in obama care is called an ipad board. and i can't -- i cannot remember this early hour what that stands for. but that one is -- if there's going to be anything that's overturned, it will be the ipad board. neither democrats nor republicans like it. it's -- the board, the -- >> independent payment -- >> thank you. the death panel so to speak. but it looks like it's -- >> you agree with me that the innovation has been stifled by not being able to charge what it takes to develop the drug, right? >> well, innovation is a funny thing. it's not necessarily dollar to dollar. i mean, sometimes you can just drop a soda in a -- you know, a petri dish and get penicillin like fleming did. >> that's not th
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
of officiating. it's an imperfect science. we think we have the best but we need to continue to improve. >> nfl football is one of the most attractive sports in terms of television and everything else. it's american -- americans love football. do you think it can expand beyond america? >> well, we had great success over in the u.k. next year we'll expand it to two games and we're playing in toronto. we have had great success in other markets like mexico and the far east. i believe our future is very bright overseas. the game is very popular. our fans on a global basis want more and more football. that's what we're doing. we're responding to that interest. >> you talked about the culture. football players in the nfl are role models and in the nba as well and in other professional sports. how do you make sure that the players appreciate that by their personal conduct? >> well, we have a personal conduct policy which was put together with the players. and it's very important because they are role models and they're held to a higher standard. i think all of us in the nfl are held
. i have what science calls the nightly stuffy nose thing. i can't breathe, so i can't sleep. and the next day i pay for it. i tried decongestants... i tossed and turned... i even vaporized. and then i fought back with drug-free breathe right. these nasal strips instantly open my nose, like a breath of fresh air. i was breathing and sleeping better. [ female announcer ] exercise your right to breathe right. get two free strips at hey it's your right to breathe right. >> osgood: 'tis the season for "a christmas story. the 1983 film in which this rather unusual lamp played a memorable role. now the story is being retold on broadway. mo rocca sets the stage. >> reporter: if "a miracle on 34th street --" >> christmas isn't just a day it's a frame of mine. >> reporter: -- and "it's a wonderful life --" >> merry christmas you wonderful old building and loan! >> reporter: -- are the frankincense and mir of christmas movies then the gold may very well be -- >> a triple dog dare you! >> reporter: -- 1983's a christmas story. >> jeff! jeff! >> reporter: if you hav
. >>> it is hard to believe, but 2013 less than a week away. we're going to look back at all the science breakthroughs of the last year coming up. ♪ everybody well don't you know it's me now? ♪ ♪ yeah who's it, who's it huh? ♪ ♪ willy's back with a brand new beat now, ♪ ♪ yeah doin' it doin' it up! ♪ heyyy yeah, tryin' to bite my style! ♪ ♪ heyyy yeah, how you like me now? ♪ ♪ na na na na na na na na ♪ and everybody go uh! campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> starbucks is now pushing politicians to avoid the massive spending cuts due to go into effect six dames from now. the ceo is asking employees at the d.c. area stores to write "come together" on their coffee cups tomorrow and friday. in a letter to employees made public today, shuttle says rather than be bystanders, you and your customers have an opportunity and i believe we all have a responsibility, to send our elected officials a respectful but poten
the hangover cure. drumroll. it's asparagus. according to the institute of medical science in south korea, thank you, south korea, asparagus and the minerals found in there extract many -- it helps your liver cells and it helps filter. that is why your pee sometimes smells different after you -- i'm just saying. >> and we have plenty of unique polkas this past year. this one started with our maestro, barry mitchell. ♪ who needs flowers, who needs sweets ♪ ♪ pledge your love with techs and tweets ♪ ♪ it's the valentine's polka ♪ even if you're not a hunk you can always text your junk ♪ ♪ that's the valentine's polka ♪ seems like just the 1% are making all the bucks ♪ ♪ like the vampire said the economy sure sucks ♪ ♪ that's the paula polka everyone sing. ♪ that's the paula polka ♪ we love to read your comments always in such a large amount ♪ ♪ it's good to spell and punctuation and grammar don't count ♪ ♪ you like us, we like you, it's the facebook polka ♪ ♪ it's late at night, you're wide awake and you're not wearing pants ♪ ♪ so grab your "wo
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)